Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Press Release 108/2014

Augmented Reality Helps in Troubleshooting

Operation Concept Facilitates Data Analysis for Predictive Maintenance of Industrial Machines
2014_108_Erweiterte_Realitaet_hilft_bei_der_Fehlersuche72dpi
Sensor data are imported into a camera shot of the plant in real time: This allows for more efficient troubleshooting. (Photo: Matthias Berning, KIT)

At a “smart” factory, machines reveal a number of data about themselves. Sensors measuring temperature, rotating speed or vibrations provide valuable information on the state of a machine. On this basis, worn parts can be exchanged in due time. A software developed by the Institute of Telematics of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) helps the maintenance staff allocate the information transmitted by the sensor in a wireless manner to the point of measurement in the camera image. The sensor data are imported into the latest camera shot of the real machine.

 

Machine tools and production plants frequently are operated for several decades. Predictive maintenance is aimed at preventing an undesired outage, if possible. Wireless sensors in the machine help detect faulty parts at an early stage. They measure and transmit data that allow conclusions to be drawn by the maintenance technician as to whether gearwheels are worn, ball bearings are uneven or the pipe of a pump is plugged. “The operation concept allows for efficient direct troubleshooting,” KIT scientist Matthias Berning says. His development for user-friendly data access makes the sensor data, such as the vibration frequency, acceleration or temperature of a component, visible on the screen in real time. The data are displayed in the camera shot. Connecting lines show the point of measurement in the machine component. When the camera pans, these connecting lines follow. For this purpose, the electrical engineer specialized in information technology uses augmented reality (AR): Images of the real world are complemented by computer-supported information.

 

When looking at the display of his tablet computer or smartphone, the maintenance engineer can directly allocate the data measured to the respective component. By a click, the data measured are represented in the form of tables or diagrams. In addition, the data are classified depending on which information is needed. As a rule, data of various measurement points have to be compared in order to detect a failure in complex machines. Direct spatial representation spares the engineer the trouble of allocating sensors and components using numbers or letters.

 

The major question in Berning’s research project is: “How can the data obtained at the interface of man and computer be used such that man understands them?” Berning develops the operation concept within the framework of his doctoral thesis at the Chair of Pervasive Computing Systems headed by Professor Michael Beigl. Here, work focuses on the development and integration of modern information and communication technologies into the physical environment. The TECO research group that closely cooperates with industry to advance research and development of applied telematics is also part of this chair. Berning’s industry partner is the ABB Corporate Research Center. “The prototypes demonstrate that utilization of the data by interlinkage with the camera shot is feasible and reasonable,” Berning says. In view of growing amounts of data supplied by the “internet of things”, it is even more important now to adapt the wealth of information to the respective task in a user-friendly manner.

 

Digital Press Kit Relating to the Science Year 2014
Communication, energy supply, mobility, industry, health care, leisure time: Digital technologies have long been part of our everyday life, they open up new opportunities and offer solutions for problems of society. At the same time, they pose challenges. Opportunities and risks will be in the focus of the Science Year 2014 – The Digital Society. At the KIT, researchers of all disciplines study various – technical and societal – aspects of digitization. The digital press kit of KIT relating to the Science Year 2014 contains short portraits, press releases, and videos:
www.pkm.kit.edu/digitalegesellschaft 

 

 

Being “The Research University in the Helmholtz Association”, KIT creates and imparts knowledge for the society and the environment. It is the objective to make significant contributions to the global challenges in the fields of energy, mobility, and information. For this, about 9,300 employees cooperate in a broad range of disciplines in natural sciences, engineering sciences, economics, and the humanities and social sciences. KIT prepares its 24,400 students for responsible tasks in society, industry, and science by offering research-based study programs. Innovation efforts at KIT build a bridge between important scientific findings and their application for the benefit of society, economic prosperity, and the preservation of our natural basis of life. KIT is one of the German universities of excellence.

afr, 16.07.2014
Monika Landgraf
Contact:

Monika Landgraf
Head of Corporate Communications, Chief Press Officer

Phone: +49 721 608-41150
Fax: +49 721 608-43658
pressePfk8∂kit edu

Margarete Lehné

Margarete Lehné
Deputy Head of Press Office

Phone: +49 721 608-41157

margarete lehne∂kit edu

Contact for this press release:

Margarete Lehné
stellv. Pressesprecherin
Phone: +49 721 608-21157
Fax: +49 721 608-41157
margarete lehneCuc5∂kit edu
The photo in the best quality available to us may be requested by
presseNpk9∂kit edu or phone: +49 721 608-47414.

The press release is available as a PDF file.