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Doris Wedlich
Head of Division
Prof. Dr. Doris Wedlich

Campus South
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
Bldg.    10.11, Room 114
Phone: +49 721 608 43990

Campus North
Monday, Wednesday
Bldg.    433, Room 109
Phone: +49 721 608 28661

 

Mail doris wedlichQmu1∂kit edu

Foto S. Fuhr
Administrative Assistant
Sabine Fuhr

Campus South
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
Bldg.    10.11, Room 113
Phone: +49 721 608 43991

Campus North
Monday, Wednesday
Bldg.    433, Room 111
Phone: +49 721 608 26081

Mail: sabine fuhrVao7∂kit edu


Ruth Schwartländer
Manager Processes
Dr. Ruth Schwartländer

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41061

Mail: ruth schwartlaenderFwv7∂kit edu

 

Dr. Christian Röthig
Manager Resources
Dr. Christian Röthig

Campus North,
Bldg.    433, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 26068

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41060

Mail: christian roethigGzn3∂kit edu

Andreas Martin
Officer
Andreas Martin

Campus North
Bldg.    433, Room 120
Phone: +49 721 608 26283

Mail: andreas martinOcf5∂kit edu

Officer

Nadja Lodes

 

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41061

Mail: nadja lodesDdd4∂kit edu

Division I - Biology, Chemistry, and Process Engineering

Division I comprises twenty KIT institutes, the KIT Department of Chemistry and Biosciences and the KIT Department of Chemical and Process Engineering as well as the Helmholtz Programme BioInterfaces.

 

Since January 1, 2014, Professor Dr. Doris Wedlich has been Head of Division I.

 

NEWS

The catalytic converter of a car converts toxic carbon monoxide (CO) into non-toxic carbon dioxide (CO2) and consists of cerium (Ce), oxygen (O), and platinum (Pt). (Figure: Gänzler/KIT)
Dynamic Catalytic Converters for Clean Air in the City

Dynamic Structure of Platinum Particles Optimizes Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment / German-French Cooperation / Publication in the Journal ‘Angewandte Chemie’.

Reducing pollutant emission of vehicles and meeting stricter exhaust gas standards are major challenges when developing catalytic converters. A new concept might help to efficiently treat exhaust gases after the cold start of engines and in urban traffic and to reduce the consumption of expensive noble metal. It is based on the interaction between platinum and the cerium oxide carrier to control catalytic activity by short-term changes of the engine’s operation mode, researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie (Applied Chemistry).

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Schematische Darstellung des SAM-I Riboschalters in der Terminator-Konformation (Schalter aus; links) und der Antiterminator-Konformation (Schalter ein; rechts). (Abbildung: APH/KIT)
How Switches Work in Bacteria

Researchers of KIT, Heidelberg University, and Freie Universität Berlin Analyze Structure and Dynamics of Riboswitches in Light Optical Single-molecule Experiments.

Many bacteria have molecular control elements, via which they can switch on and off genes. These riboswitches also open up new options in the development of antibiotics or for the detection and decomposition of environmental toxins. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Heidelberg University, and Freie Universität Berlin have now used light optical microscopy of single molecules to fundamentally study the way riboswitches work. This is reported in Nature Chemical Biology. (DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.2476)

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Dr. Cornelia Lee-Thedieck (Foto: Markus Breig, KIT)
Bone Marrow Models to Study Blood and Musculoskeletal Disorders

Dr. Cornelia Lee-Thedieck Receives ERC Starting Grant of EUR 1.5 Million for Five Years

For her research on the development of hematological and musculoskeletal disorders, Dr. Cornelia Lee-Thedieck, scientist at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), is awarded an ERC Starting Grant: The European Research Council decided to fund her project “bloodANDbone” with EUR 1.5 million for five years. At KIT’s Institute of Functional Interfaces (IFG), Lee-Thedieck develops models of the human bone marrow to study the regeneration of blood and bone by stem cells and how this regeneration is disturbed in diseases like leukemia or bone metastases.

 

 

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The porphyrin molecule – used in electrodes – speeds up the charging process of batteries in the lab. (Source: KIT/HIU)
Natural Molecule to Boost the Performance of Electrodes for Rechargeable Batteries


Lab tests show that a novel material based on the organic porphyrin molecule allows to charge batteries within one single minute
Chlorophyll, blood, and vitamin B12 are all based on the porphyrin molecule. But porphyrin can also be used as an electrode material where it speeds up the charging process of rechargeable batteries. In the “Angewandte Chemie International Edition” journal, researchers from KIT now present the new material system that could mark the beginning of an era of high-performance energy storage and supercapacitors. 

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 A protein (colored red) is located at the tip of a hypha of Aspergillus nidulans and controls growth. The hypha is about 3 micrometers in diameter and extends by about 1 micrometer per minute. (Photo: KIT)
Growth Mechanism of Fungi Decoded


Fungal Cells Do not Grow by Division, but Extend Almost Infinitely – Video Sequence Illustrates Growth
[2017_068_Wachstumsmechanismus der Pilze entschluesselt_72dpi]
Fungi grow with tubular cells extending by kilometers. Growth takes place exclusively at the tip. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now found out how this works: Construction materials are transported on rails through the fungal cells and used at their outermost tip. Calcium concentration at the end of the cell defines when this happens. This is reported by the scientists in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS).

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3-dimensional microstructures can be written using a laser, erased, and rewritten. (Photo: KIT)
Erasable Ink for 3D Printing

Laser-written Three-dimensional Microstructures Can Be Erased and Rewritten, if Desired – Very Important Paper Publication in Angewandte Chemie

3D printing by direct laser writing produces micrometer-sized structures with precisely defined properties. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to erase the ink used for 3D printing. In this way, the small structures of up to 100 nm in size can be erased and rewritten repeatedly. One nanometer corresponds to one millionth of a millimeter. This development opens up many new applications of 3D fabrication in biology or materials sciences, for instance.

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