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Andrea Robitzki
Head of Division
Prof. Dr. Andrea Robitzki

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 114
Phone: +49 721 608 43990

Campus North
Bldg.    433, Room 109
Phone: +49 721 608 28661

Mail andrea robitzkiMwh0∂kit edu

Foto S. Fuhr
Administrative Assistant
Sabine Fuhr

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 113
Phone: +49 721 608 43991

Campus North
Bldg.    433, Room 111
Phone: +49 721 608 26081

Mail: sabine fuhrPuz2∂kit edu

 


Manager Processes
n.n
Dr. Christian Röthig
Manager Resources
Dr. Christian Röthig

Campus North,
Bldg.    433, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 26068

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41060

Mail: christian roethigRca3∂kit edu

Andreas Martin
Officer
Andreas Martin

Campus North
Bldg.    433, Room 120
Phone: +49 721 608 26283

Mail: andreas martinPlk0∂kit edu

Officer

Nadja Lodes

 

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41061

Mail: nadja lodesUyl7∂kit edu

Division I - Biology, Chemistry, and Process Engineering

Division I comprises twenty KIT institutes, the KIT Department of Chemistry and Biosciences and the KIT Department of Chemical and Process Engineering as well as the Helmholtz Programme BioInterfaces in Technology and Medicine.

 

Since February 15th, 2020, Professor Dr. Andrea Robitzki has been Head of Division I.

 

NEWS

With its essential oils, mint keeps away weeds – the menthone contained in the oil might be used as a basis of environmentally friendly bioherbicides. (Photo: Jana Müller)
Mint Scent Inhibits the Growth of Weeds

New Approach to Sustainable Weed Control is Based on Studies of Biological Communication between Plants – Menthone Has Bioherbicide Potential: Some plants are very successful in the competition for space, nutrients, and water. They inhibit the growth of their competitors by chemical signals that cause cells of the neighboring plant to die. Scientists of the Botanical Institute of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) study this effect for potential use in environmentally compatible bioherbicides.

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Within the BATTERY 2030+ project, robots aren’t solely used to produce new batteries. They also plan and evaluate their own experiments autonomously using AI. (Photo: Daniel Messling, KIT)
Roadmap for Battery Research in Europe

The European Research Initiative BATTERY 2030+ Presents Goals – Research Platform CELEST with KIT, Ulm University, and ZSW Participates: To develop tomorrow’s batteries, partners from science and industry all over Europe have launched the research initiatve BATTERY 2030+. Now, a roadmap defines the milestones in more detail: A joint platform for the development of materials with the help of artificial intelliegence (AI), networked sensors and self-healing technology for batteries, and sustainable production and recycling processes.

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In the NECOC research project, an integrated pilot plant is being built to test a new process for reducing the greenhouse gas CO2 in the atmosphere. The process will produce carbon black - a high-quality, solid carbon. (Photo: Moritz Leg)
From Greenhouse Gas to a High-tech Resource

At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the NECOC research project is aimed at building a unique test facility for active reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The world’s first container-scale facility of this type is to convert CO2 contained in ambient air into highly pure carbon black powder that can be used as a resource in industry. Project partners are INERATEC GmbH, a spinoff of KIT, and Climeworks, a spinoff of ETH Zurich.

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Researchers cultivate plant cells in biochips to study the effect of various signalling substances on the cells. (Photo: Alexandra Wolf, KIT)
Plant Protection: Communication instead of Poison

Increasing drought and heat seriously affect plants. In the Upper Rhine area, for example, climate change results in the development of new plant diseases, an example being Esca, a disease that causes vines to die. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and partners have now launched the DialogProTec project that focuses on new approaches to plant protection without herbicides and fungicides.

More about "Plant Protection: Communication instead of Poison"