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Monika Landgraf
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Phone: +49 721 608-47414
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Press Release 077/2012

Plant Growth Without Light Control

Synthetic Photoreceptor Stimulates Germination and Development Irrespective of Exposure to Light / Results of Researchers from Japan and Karlsruhe Are Published in The Plant Cell Journal
Der Keimling rechts wurde mit synthetischem Photorezeptor gefüttert und öffnet  seine Keimblätter. In der Dunkelkontrolle (linker Keimling) bleiben sie geschlossen.  (Bild: P. Lamparter, KIT)
The seedling on the right was fed with a synthetic photoreceptor and opens it cotyledons. In the dark control (left seedling), they remain closed. (Figure: T. Lamparter, KIT)

Plants are dependent on the sun. Sunlight does not only supply them with energy, but also controls their development steps. So-called photoreceptors activate the processes of germination, leaf development, bud formation, and blossoming in the cells. The light-absorbing component of a photoreceptor may be replaced by a chemically similar synthetic substance. For the first time, the effects on complete plants are now described in the The Plant Cell journal (DOI: 10.1105/tpc.111.094656).

“The plants developed in the dark as if they were in light,” says the Director of the studies Tilman Lamparter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The seeds and seedlings of thale cress were fed with a synthetic substance named “15Ea-phycocyanobilin". In the plant cell, this substance replaces the natural, photoactive component of the photoreceptor, the “phytochromobilin". Incorporation of 15Ea-PCB activates the photoreceptor and the plant is made believe it is exposed to light. In spite of the darkness, model plants germinate and grow similar to a control group exposed to light. “It was shown for the first time that synthetic substances can cause light effects in entire plants.”

Synthetic photoreceptors might be valuable tools for research, as they facilitate studies of many chemical plant processes compared to conventional genetic engineering methods. Apart from growth, photosynthesis can also be investigated much better. “Blossoming of flowers or development of the photosynthesis system may be controlled much better in the future,” predicts Lamparter. “These findings would be of high use for agricultural industry in the cultivation of flowers or biomass production, for instance.” In the future, it is planned to study related aspects in further detail. 

Publication in The Plant Cell:
http://www.plantcell.org/content/early/2012/05/10/tpc.111.094656

More information on Lamparter’s working group.

 

Being „The Research University in the Helmholtz Association“, KIT creates and imparts knowledge for the society and the environment. It is the objective to make significant contributions to the global challenges in the fields of energy, mobility and information. For this, about 9,300 employees cooperate in a broad range of disciplines in natural sciences, engineering sciences, economics, and the humanities and social sciences. KIT prepares its 26,000 students for responsible tasks in society, industry, and science by offering research-based study programs. Innovation efforts at KIT build a bridge between important scientific findings and their application for the benefit of society, economic prosperity, and the preservation of our natural basis of life.

kes, 14.05.2012

For further information, please contact:

Kosta Schinarakis
Themenscout
Tel.: +49 721 608-41956
Fax: +49 721 608-43568
E-Mail:schinarakis@kit.edu
The photo of printing quality may be requested by presseUhi0∂kit edu or phone: +49 721 608-47414. The press release is available as a PDF file.