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Foto_Wedlich(1)
Head of Division
Prof. Dr. Doris Wedlich

Campus South
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
Bldg.    10.11, Room 114
Phone: +49 721 608 43990

Campus North
Monday, Wednesday
Bldg.    433, Room 109
Phone: +49 721 608 28661

 

Mail doris wedlichCzr4∂kit edu

Foto S. Fuhr
Secretary
Sabine Fuhr

Campus South
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
Bldg.    10.11, Room 113
Phone: +49 721 608 43991

Campus North
Monday, Wednesday
Bldg.    433, Room 111
Phone: +49 721 608 26081

Mail: sabine fuhrQim0∂kit edu


Referentin
Manager Processes
Dr. Ruth Schwartländer

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41061

Mail: ruth schwartlaenderPln6∂kit edu

 

Dr. Christian Röthig
Manager Resources
Dr. Christian Röthig

Campus North,
Bldg.    433, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 26068

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41060

Mail: christian roethigVum0∂kit edu

Andreas Martin
Officer
Andreas Martin

Campus North
Bldg.    433, Room 120
Phone: +49 721 608 26283

Mail: andreas martinLpf5∂kit edu

Officer

Nadja Lodes

 

Campus South
Bldg.    10.11, Room 112
Phone: +49 721 608 41061

Mail: nadja lodesRzq2∂kit edu

Division I - Biology, Chemistry, and Process Engineering

Division I comprises twenty KIT institutes, the KIT Department of Chemistry and Biosciences and the KIT Department of Chemical and Process Engineering as well as the Helmholtz Programme BioInterfaces.

 

Since January 1, 2014, Professor Dr. Doris Wedlich has been Head of Division I.

 

NEWS

The metal-organic framework is set up like a sandwich (a). The molecular textile layer is woven in an active layer that is embedded between so-called sacrificial layers (b). (Image: KIT)
Metal-organic Frameworks Used as Looms

Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have made major progress in the production of two-dimensional polymer-based materials. To produce cloths from monomolecular threads, the scientists used SURMOFs, i.e. surface-mounted metal-organic frameworks, developed by KIT. They inserted four-armed monomers, i.e. smaller molecular building blocks, into some SURMOF layers. Cross-linking of the monomers then resulted in textiles consisting of interwoven polymer threads. This work is now presented in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14442)

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Severely hyperbranched vascular network surrounding the spinal cord (red dotted box) of zebrafish embryo – blood vessels in white (Bild: le Noble/KIT)
Neurons Modulate the Growth of Blood Vessels

First Hampered, Then Released: Nerve cells regulate the density of blood vessel network dynamical-ly by fine modulation of signaling molecules.

A team of researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) shake at the foundations of a dogma of cell biology. By detailed series of experiments, they proved that blood vessel growth is modulated by neurons and not, as assumed so far, through a control mechanism of the vessel cells among each other. The results are groundbreaking for research into and treatment of vascular diseases, tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. The study will be published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications.

 

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Eine MOF-Membran mit eingebauten Fotoschaltern trennt Moleküle. Über die Lichteinstrahlung lässt sich der Trennfaktor stufenlos einstellen. (Abbildung: Alexander Knebel/Universität Hannover und Lars Heinke/KIT)
Light Opens and Closes Windows in Membranes

Metal-organic Frameworks (MOFs) with Photoswitchable Azobenzene Molecules Enable Tunable Separation of Substance Mixtures – Publication in Nature Communications

Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Universität Hannover developed novel membranes, whose selectivity can be switched dynamically with the help of light. For this purpose, azobenzene molecules were integrated into membranes made of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Depending on the irradiation wavelength, these azobenzene units in the MOFs adopt a stretched or angular form. In this way, it is possible to dynamically adjust the permeability of the membrane and the separation factor of gases or liquids. The results are reported in Nature Communications. (DOI:10.1038/ncomms13872) 

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For the First Time, Light Is Used to Specifically Design Defined Molecule Chains / Publication in Nature Communications
Macromolecules: Light to Design Precision Polymers

For the First Time, Light Is Used to Specifically Design Defined Molecule Chains / Publication in Nature Communications .

Chemists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have succeeded in specifically controlling the setup of precision polymers by light-induced chemical reactions. The new method allows for the precise, planned arrangement of the chain links, i.e. monomers, along polymer chains of standard length. The precisely structured macromolecules develop defined properties and may possibly be suited for use as storage systems of information or synthetic biomolecules. This novel synthesis reaction is now reported in open-access Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/NCOMMS13672).

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The microscopic fluorescence image reveals structures printed onto the biode-gradable coating for test purposes. (Photo: KIT)
Biodegradable Polymer Coating for Implants


For the First Time, Biodegradable Polymers Were Synthesized by Chemical Vapor Deposition/ Paper in Angewandte Chemie

Medical implants often carry surface substrates that release active substances or to which biomolecules or cells can adhere better. However, degradable gas-phase coatings for degradable implants, such as surgical suture materials or scaffolds for tissue culturing, have been lacking so far. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology now present a polymer coating that is degraded in the body together with its carrier. (DOI:10.1002/ange.201609307)

 

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Interconnected mechanical, electrical, and thermal processes in lithium-ion batteries are subject of the work of the SiMET Research Training Group.
Simulation of Lithium-ion Batteries

DFG Funds New SiMET Research Training Group at KIT – Doctoral Researchers Study Mechanical, Electrical, and Thermal Effects from the Particle to the Cell.

The German Research Foundation (DFG) has decided to fund a new research training group at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT): “SiMET – Simulation of Mechanical, Electrical, and Thermal Processes in Lithium-ion Batteries” will start in 2017 and be funded initially for four and a half years. Within the research training group, doctoral researchers of several scientific disciplines will work on models to simulate, among others, the effect of different internal structures on the behavior of bat-teries in operation.

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